White Pomeranians: Searching for the Unicorn?

If you were to research white Pomeranians on your own and speak to various breeders you would learn that producing a pure white coat is the most difficult color of them all to breed when attempting to breed show quality Pomeranians.

Because they are so difficult to breed there are relatively few out there available for purchase.  Also, with feverish demand by the public so high, white Pomeranians can command exceptionally high prices — and white teacup Pomeranians even more!

This can and does lead some unethical breeders to scam unwitting buyers out of their hard earned money by passing off a non-white Pomeranian as a real, honest-to-goodness White Pomeranian.  The truth is that many light and cream colored Poms start out as pure white puppies that eventually change color as they age.  This happens all the time when puppies begin to lose their puppy coat at around 4-8 months and the sellers are long gone with your money after you have handed it over – especially, if you are buying through a backyard breeder – which of course you should not do!

FACT: The earliest examples of the breed were white!

Buying a high-priced designer puppy online really takes a leap of faith.  You have no idea if the dog you are buying is really the same dog you see in the picture.  And when it comes to white Poms and white teacup Pomeranians, you need to be especially certain that the image has not been “photoshopped” to give the white Pomeranian puppy for sale that beautiful snow-like appearance.

You can’t just breed two white poms and call it a day.  What will quickly happen in this situation is that the coat and pigmentation attributes will degrade. In fact, in a couple of generations of breeding white Pomeranians together, the breed will revert back to its German Spitz roots.

Fortunately, for diversity sake, there are many shades of whites and blacks. Unfortunately, when it comes to breeding these various shades make it incredibly challenging to produce pure white and black Pomeranians. The constant struggle for professional Pomeranian breeders is finding that right balance between breeding out the other colors without losing the benefits these colors bring to the table.

The following passage from WhitePom illustrates this point:

Breeding out to the other colors like Orange improves type, but can cause lemon shadings, or what some people refer to as “ivory white” in the White Pomeranians. Lemon tones on your White Pomeranians, can be very difficult to breed out at a later stage.  A quote from the Pomeranian breed standard:

“Whites must be quite free from lemon or any other colour.”

Canton Pomeranians, another prominent Pomeranian breeder states that whites are incredibly difficult to breed and that you also have to watch out for other factors that may tint or color the dogs white coat as it matures.  He writes:

Puppies may be born white but as they grow older, the back of the ears, the saddle at the back of the body, and other parts, tend to become yellowish.  And so, they should be kept clean and washed all the time.  In our area wherein our water is from the deep well, the water has a lot of mineral including manganese, which turns the white coat to light cream/yellow; chlorinated water becomes necessary.  The dog cages has to be stainless…or risk the rust of an old cage to transform their white coat from yellow to light red; the play pen should be stainless steel.  Plus, they should be kept individually separate or risk their playful attitude…plus saliva to stain and redden their immaculate clean and white coats.  This discoloration is partly genetic but a lot of it has to do with care and maintenance. An additional big problem is the tear staining the many dogs have…and in the whites, one can easily be brought in despair.

Finding a true white Pomeranian can be an elusive task.  If you are genuinely and sincerely interested in purchasing a snow white Pom, please do your due diligence so that you do not become another victim.  There are so many horror stories about people trying to purchase a white Pomeranian or a teacup Pomeranian and getting scammed.